tag archives: photography

 

do you believe in coincidence?  or, in connectivity?  such as, six degrees of separation, the theory that social distance is composed of six or fewer social network connections?

 

consider the following connections:

connection number one (numero uno):  a book

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano), an outstanding book about 20th century milanese architecture.  featuring the entrances of 144 residential buildings built during the 1920’s through the 1970’s.

 

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz

photo via taschen

 

connection number two (numero due):  two windows

i discovered entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) while researching leaded glass window designs for an innerspace interior design project.

most of the buildings in the book were designed by renowned architects, including giovanni muzio (1893-1982), giuseppe martinenghi (1894-1970), piero portaluppi (1888-1967), or giovanni (gio) ponti (1891-1979).  most of the entrances retain their original materials, fittings, and artwork, designed by the architects.  or, by industrial designers, such as angelo mangiarotti (1921-2012) or vico magistretti (1920-2006).  or, by artists, such as lucio fontana (1899-1968) or gio pomodoro (1930-2002).  most of their designs were fabricated by local artisans using local materials, including glass, stone, mosaics, ceramics, or metal.  and, most of the entrances retain their original lighting fixtures.  lighting designers or manufacturers include artimede, fontana arte, gino sarfatti (1912-1985), stilnovo, or venini.

the book could be considered a reference for 20th century italian design.  not only, because of the visually stunning photography.  but also, because of the captions, which document the location; the date; the architect, designer, or artist; and the materials, fittings, or artworks.  the index even includes a map.

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) is the most outstanding design book that i have discovered recently.

the book became the inspiration for the window designs.  and, the inspiration for a walking tour of entryways the next time that my husband, bob, and i visit milan.

in addition to considering many inspirations from the book, my clients and i considered the artistic and technical expertise of theodore ellison designs, who is now developing the design concepts and the technical drawings.  and then, constructing the leaded glass windows.

 

via mario giuriati 5 | designed by giovanni muzio | 1930-1931

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | page 10

photography by delfino sisto legnani

 

conceptual leaded glass window design | lisa walsh | innerspace

 

viale regina giovanna 32 | designed by giuseppe martinenghi | 1936-1938

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | pages 48-49

photography by matthew billings

 

conceptual leaded glass window design | lisa walsh | innerspace

 

via raimondo franchetti 3 | designed by domenico poloni | 1937-1939

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | pages 134-135

photography by paola pansini

 

conceptual leaded glass window design | lisa walsh | innerspace

 

connection number three (numero tre):  a handbag

as promoted on instagram.  one of the book’s photographers, delfino sisto legnani, also collaborates with milanese luxury leather brand, valextra.  their latest collaboration is a limited edition collection for valextra x extramilano.  eleven variations of iconic valextra handbags, inspired by entryways of milan (ingressi di milano).

 

corso sempione 33 | palazzo ina | designed by piero bottoni | 1953-1957

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | pages 276-277

photography by delfino sisto legnani via valextra

 

valextra x extramilano | tric trac bag

photo credit valextra

 

via plinio 54

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | page 80

photography by delfino sisto legnani via valextra

 

valextra x extramilano | brera top handle medium bag

photo credit valextra

 

corso italia 9 | designed by gio ponti | 1934

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | page 264

photography by delfino sisto legnani via valextra

 

valextra x extramilano | series s mini bag

photo credit valextra

 

via morozzo della rocco 10 | designed by mario ugge | 1935-1937

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | page 362

photography by delfino sisto legnani

 

valextra x extramilano | iside medium bag

photo credit valextra

 

via privata cesare mangili 6 | ca’ brutta | designed by giovanni muzio, pier fausto barelli, and vittorino colonnese | 1919-1923

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | page 215

photography by delfino sisto legnani

 

valextra x extramilano | iside mini bag

photo credit valextra

 

via amatore sciesa 24

entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) | edited and directed by karl kobitz | page 233

photography by delfino sisto legnani

 

valextra x extramilano | iside medium bag

photo credit valextra

 

valextra is one of my favorite italian brands.  i love shopping with martina at the valextra flagship boutique on via manzoni in milan.  i especially love their white (pergamena) handbags.

i am now looking forward to the arrival of my new entryways of milan (ingressi di milano) inspired iside bag.

 

david hockney: something new in painting (and photography) [and even printing]

5 april-12 may 2018

pace gallery | 508-510 west 25th street | new york, NY

 

british artist, david hockney RA, is known for playing with perspective.  recently, reverse perspective.  and recently, manipulating the picture plane by adding corners.  hockney thinks that reverse perspective simulates our depth perception more closely than one point perspective.  and, that a hexagon simulates our field of vision more closely than a rectangle.

 

‘the indentations paradoxically widen the sense of space and invite all sorts of fresh lines of sight.

still, though, as you can see, far from cutting corners, i was adding them.’

-david hockney

 

detail | david hockney | the studio, december 2017 | 2017 | photographic drawing printed on seven sheets of paper, mounted on seven sheets of dibond

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credit: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

the subject of some of the hexagonal paintings are ‘david hockney’s greatest hits’.  the grand canyonnichols canyon, which was once en route from his home to his studio in los angeles, CA.  garrowby hill and the countryside surrounding his former home in yorkshire, united kingdom.

david hockney | grand canyon II | 2017 | acrylic on canvas

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

david hockney | nichols canyon II | 2017 | acrylic and black ink on canvas

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

david hockney | garrowby hill | 2017 | acrylic on canvas

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

masterpieces, such as the avenue at middelharnis (1689), a dutch golden age landscape painting by meindert hobbema, or the annunciation (1438-1445), an early renaissance fresco by fra angelico, provide the subjects for other paintings.

david hockney | tall dutch trees after hobbema (useful knowledge) | 2017 | acrylic on six canvases

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

hockney is also known for experimenting with optical technology.  most recently, agisoft photoscan software that performs photogrammetric processing of digital images and generates three dimensional spatial data.

in addition to 17 paintings, the pace gallery exhibition features two, seven panel, floor to ceiling photomurals created with agisoft photoscan.  for each photomural, the software combined over 3000 photographs, shot from multiple camera angles, and processed them into one three dimensional image.  then, hockney and his assistant manipulated the image.  and then, they digitally printed and mounted the photomural.

david hockney | the studio, december 2017 | 2017 | photographic drawing printed on seven sheets of paper, mounted on seven sheets of dibond

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

david hockney | inside it opens up as well | 2018 | photographic drawing printed on 7 sheets of paper, mounted on 7 sheets of dibond

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

‘i haven’t yet quite figured out what to call the whole process, or for that matter its result.

it’s a combination of photography and drawing and printing, each bringing out the best in the other.’

-david hockney

 

you could call the whole process a success.  especially, considering that hockney originally only intended to take documentary photographs to use in the exhibition announcement before the paintings left his studio.

invitation to the opening reception | 5 april 2018

photo credit via new york social diary

 

click here, here, and here to read my previous posts about david hockney.

click here to read the essay, written by lawrence weschler for the exhibition catalogue.