tag archives: pace gallery

 

david hockney: something new in painting (and photography) [and even printing]

5 april-12 may 2018

pace gallery | 508-510 west 25th street | new york, NY

 

british artist, david hockney RA, is known for playing with perspective.  recently, reverse perspective.  and recently, manipulating the picture plane by adding corners.  hockney thinks that reverse perspective simulates our depth perception more closely than one point perspective.  and, that a hexagon simulates our field of vision more closely than a rectangle.

 

‘the indentations paradoxically widen the sense of space and invite all sorts of fresh lines of sight.

still, though, as you can see, far from cutting corners, i was adding them.’

-david hockney

 

detail | david hockney | the studio, december 2017 | 2017 | photographic drawing printed on seven sheets of paper, mounted on seven sheets of dibond

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credit: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

the subject of some of the hexagonal paintings are ‘david hockney’s greatest hits’.  the grand canyonnichols canyon, which was once en route from his home to his studio in los angeles, CA.  garrowby hill and the countryside surrounding his former home in yorkshire, united kingdom.

david hockney | grand canyon II | 2017 | acrylic on canvas

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

david hockney | nichols canyon II | 2017 | acrylic and black ink on canvas

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

david hockney | garrowby hill | 2017 | acrylic on canvas

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

masterpieces, such as the avenue at middelharnis (1689), a dutch golden age landscape painting by meindert hobbema, or the annunciation (1438-1445), an early renaissance fresco by fra angelico, provide the subjects for other paintings.

david hockney | tall dutch trees after hobbema (useful knowledge) | 2017 | acrylic on six canvases

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

hockney is also known for experimenting with optical technology.  most recently, agisoft photoscan software that performs photogrammetric processing of digital images and generates three dimensional spatial data.

in addition to 17 paintings, the pace gallery exhibition features two, seven panel, floor to ceiling photomurals created with agisoft photoscan.  for each photomural, the software combined over 3000 photographs, shot from multiple camera angles, and processed them into one three dimensional image.  then, hockney and his assistant manipulated the image.  and then, they digitally printed and mounted the photomural.

david hockney | the studio, december 2017 | 2017 | photographic drawing printed on seven sheets of paper, mounted on seven sheets of dibond

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

david hockney | inside it opens up as well | 2018 | photographic drawing printed on 7 sheets of paper, mounted on 7 sheets of dibond

artwork: (c) 2018 david hockney photo credits: lisa walsh | innerspace

 

‘i haven’t yet quite figured out what to call the whole process, or for that matter its result.

it’s a combination of photography and drawing and printing, each bringing out the best in the other.’

-david hockney

 

you could call the whole process a success.  especially, considering that hockney originally only intended to take documentary photographs to use in the exhibition announcement before the paintings left his studio.

invitation to the opening reception | 5 april 2018

photo credit via new york social diary

 

click here, here, and here to read my previous posts about david hockney.

click here to read the essay, written by lawrence weschler for the exhibition catalogue.

during a recent trip to new york, i finally visited the judd foundation, located at 101 spring street, the former residence and studio of sculptor donald judd (1928-1994).

so, a quote in a recent article about canopy beds in the design & decorating section of the wall street journal caught my attention.

‘going to bed in my canopy…is almost like sleeping in a donald judd sculpture.’

-len morgan, new york architectural designer

CFDJ20FreestandingConcrete1

DonaldJuddNYC201103

donald judd (1928-1994) | 15 untitled works in concrete | 1980-1984 | the chinati foundation | marfa, TX

donald judd (1928-1994) | untitled | granite | 1978

donald judd:  works in granite, cor-ten, plywood, and enamel on aluminum | pace gallery | new york, NY | 18 february-26 march 2011

photo credits cintani and pace gallery

canopy and four poster beds do make you feel like you are sleeping in a structure.  or, in a room within a room.

bedroom|jupiter FL|architect manuel j. diaz|designer furze bard + associates|william waldron|ADbedroom|la reserve hotel|paris france|ruemag.comOD-BG316_CANOPY_J_20150513144241

master bedroom | jupiter, FL | interior design by furze bard + associates

bedroom | la reserve paris hotel, spa and apartments | paris, france | interior design by rémi tessier

bedroom | kiev, ukraine | design by igor sirotov

photo credits william waldron, ruemag.com and igor sirotov

ironically, donald judd really did sleep within a sculpture.  a wall length fluorescent light sculpture by his friend dan flavin (1933-1996).

judd|flavin|josh white|donald judd art (c)|npr.org

dan flavin (1933-1996) | flourescent light sculpture | 1970

master bedroom | 5th floor | judd foundation | 101 spring street | new york, NY

photo credit josh white